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Inclusive of many kinds of bodies

Inclusive of many kinds of bodies

Inclusive of many kinds of bodies

Inclusive of many kinds of bodies

Inclusive of many kinds of bodies

Know
Your Body

Uterus1

The uterus (also called your womb) is a muscular organ where the fertilized egg implants and the fetus grows during pregnancy. The cells lining the uterus are normally shed every month with the menstrual flow, unless you become pregnant. With pregnancy, the embryo produces a hormone that signals the uterine lining to stay intact to nourish the growing fetus.

1 Knudtson. J. Female Internal Genital Organs. Merck Manuals Consumer Version.

Ovaries2

You have two ovaries. They’re about the size of a thumb, and there’s one on each side of your uterus, near the opening of the fallopian tube. Ovaries have two main jobs: producing eggs and producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

2 Rice University. Anatomy and Physiology of the Female Reproductive System.

Fallopian Tubes1

These are the two tubes that connect your ovaries to your uterus. After ovulation, an egg travels from the ovary to the fallopian tube. The egg and sperm meet here for fertilization. Once an egg is fertilized, the embryo spends several more days moving through the Fallopian tubes before implanting in the uterus.

1 Knudtson. J. Female Internal Genital Organs. Merck Manuals Consumer Version.

Menstruation2,3 

This is your period. If an egg and sperm don’t meet up in the fallopian tube, then the egg disintegrates, and the uterine lining breaks down and is released from the body through your vagina when you menstruate. Your menstrual cycle begins with the first day of bleeding, which is counted as day 1, and ends just before the next menstrual period. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days long, but cycles can vary, typically lasting between 21 to 35 days.

2 Rice University. Anatomy and Physiology of the Female Reproductive System.

3 Cleveland Clinic. Normal Menstruation.

Cervix1

The cervical canal is the passage sperm travels through to fertilize an egg.

1 Knudtson. J. Female Internal Genital Organs. Merck Manuals Consumer Version.

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Slynd® Important Risk Information


Slynd does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).
What is Slynd?
SLYND is a birth control pill (oral contraceptive) that is used by females who can become pregnant to prevent pregnancy.
The progestin drospirenone may increase potassium levels in your blood. You should not take SLYND if you have kidney, liver or adrenal disease because this could cause serious heart problems as well as other health problems. Other medicines may also increase potassium levels in your blood. If you are currently on daily, long-term treatment for a chronic health condition with any of the medicines listed below, talk to your healthcare provider about whether SLYND is right for you. If you take any of the medicines listed below for a chronic health condition you should have a blood test to check the potassium level in your blood before you start taking SLYND and during the first month that you take SLYND.

Slynd® Important Risk Information


Slynd does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

What is SLYND?

SLYND is a birth control pill (oral contraceptive) that is used by females who can become pregnant to prevent pregnancy.

The progestin drospirenone may increase potassium levels in your blood. You should not take SLYND if you have kidney, liver or adrenal disease because this could cause serious heart problems as well as other health problems. Other medicines may also increase potassium levels in your blood. If you are currently on daily, long-term treatment for a chronic health condition with any of the medicines listed below, talk to your healthcare provider about whether SLYND is right for you. If you take any of the medicines listed below for a chronic health condition you should have a blood test to check the potassium level in your blood before you start taking SLYND and during the first month that you take SLYND.

  • medicines to treat fungal infections, such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, or voriconazole
  • medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection or Hepatitis C infection, such as indinavir or boceprevir
  • clarithromycin

Do not take SLYND if you:

  • have kidney disease or kidney failure.
  • have reduced adrenal gland function.
  • have or have had cervical cancer or any cancer that is sensitive to female hormones.
  • have liver disease, including liver tumors.
  • have unexplained vaginal bleeding.

Tell your healthcare providers if you have or have had any of these conditions. Your healthcare provider can suggest a different method of birth control.

If any of these conditions happen while you are taking SLYND, stop taking SLYND right away and talk to your healthcare provider. Use non-hormonal contraception when you stop taking SLYND.

Before you take SLYND, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • are pregnant or think you may be pregnant.
  • have ever had blood clots in your legs (deep vein thrombosis), lungs (pulmonary embolism), or a stroke or heart attack (myocardial infarction).
  • have or have had depression.

Tell your healthcare providers about all the medicines you take including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements, such as St. John’s Wort. SLYND may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how well SLYND works.

What are the possible serious side effects of SLYND?

SLYND may cause serious side effects, including:

  • High potassium levels in your blood (hyperkalemia). Certain medicines and conditions can also increase the potassium levels in your blood. Your healthcare provider may check the potassium levels in your blood before and during treatment with SLYND. Call your healthcare provider or go to a hospital emergency room right away if you have signs or symptoms of high potassium levels in your blood including:
    • weakness or numbness in an arm or leg.
    • palpitations (feel like your heart is racing or fluttering) or irregular heartbeat.
    • nausea.
    • vomiting.
    • severe pain in your chest.
    • shortness of breath.
  • Blood clot forming in blood vessels. Tell your healthcare provider if you have had a blood clot. Tell your healthcare provider if you plan to have surgery or are not able to be active due to illness or injury. Call your healthcare provider or go to a hospital or emergency room right away if you have:
    • leg pain that will not go away.
    • a sudden, severe headache unlike your usual headaches.
    • sudden, severe shortness of breath.
    • sudden change in vision or blindness.
    • chest pain.
    • weakness or numbness in your arm or leg.
    • trouble speaking.
  • Bone loss.
  • Cervical Cancer.
  • Liver problems, including liver tumors.
  • Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy in your tubes). This is a medical emergency that often requires surgery. If you have severe abdominal pain, call your healthcare provider or go to a hospital emergency room right away.
  • Risk of high blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.
  • Changes in menstrual bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have changes in menstrual bleeding.
  • Depression, especially if you have had depression in the past.

What are the most common side effects of SLYND?

  • acne
  • headache
  • breast pain and tenderness
  • weight gain
  • menstrual cramps
  • nausea
  • severe vaginal bleeding
  • less sexual desire

These are not all the possible side effects of SLYND.

What else should I know about taking SLYND?

If you are scheduled for any lab tests, tell your healthcare provider you are taking SLYND. Certain blood tests may be affected by SLYND.

These are not all the possible side effects and risks of SLYND. Please click here to read full Prescribing Information before starting SLYND.

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